History Of The Blog

Blogs started out as a natural extension of the increased use of computers and the creation of the earliest forms of the Internet as government military, scientific and academic networks. Before the World Wide Web, communities of people interacted on these networks. Individuals created content for themselves or others and stored that content on computers that were connected to the networks. Before blogs became popular, these communities often communicated and shared frequently-updated content through community message boards. The term “newsgroups” became coined to describe many of these discussion and information-sharing areas.

The earliest true blogs started appearing around 1994 or 1995 as open access diaries where individuals shared updates about their lives, such as personal thoughts and facts about events related to their families, academic studies, career, travels and other topics. Early online diary writers include Claudio Pinhanez, Justin Hall and Carolyn Burke. The media and public really started noticing the content and documenting its formation around approximately 1996 and 1997.

The exact date and year of the first use of the term “blog” is still debated by scholars. Most believe that it happened in 1999 as the natural truncation of a particular description of this type of content, “web log” or “weblog,” into the shortened form. Some debate exists on pronunciation. Obviously, the term describes a diary or log located and accessible on the World Wide Web. As time passed, some people thought that “weblog” should be pronounced “we blog” to refer to individuals performing the action of blogging.

Blogs vs Websites – What is the difference?

The primary difference between a blog and a website is that a blog is a specific type of content displayed on web pages on a website. Confusion often occurs because individuals and representatives of businesses often use the two terms interchangeably. For example, someone might say that they visited a company’s blog when in fact the blog was merely one part of the company’s website. Confusion also occurs because platforms that are devoted entirely to blogging create the impression that a person’s or company’s blog on one of these platforms is also their primary website.

To help sort it all out, keep the following in mind: In most cases, non-blogging websites are updated with new content less frequently then associated blog pages and blog-devoted websites. Blogs typically receive weekly, daily or even less than hourly updates. Non-blog websites, such as individual personal interest and biography or business sites, typically only update their news and blog content at that frequency and then add new pages or update some content as needed. Blogs also promote discussion. They have comment sections designed to create online conversations about blog content and blog owners in a similar fashion as comment sections provided to readers by news media platforms and other publishers under online articles.

Blog posts Vs Pages – What is the difference?

Simply put, the blog content that you pull up in your browser appears on a web page. The term “page” describes the document and the location. It is important to note that the term “blog” is also frequently used to describe a collection of web pages that specifically share blog content, especially on blog-focused websites. This usage is similar to how people describe a collection of pages in a diary, journal or log collectively as the object. As previously mentioned, blog content is updated frequently. Many websites have non-blog pages that contain content that rarely changes, such as a company’s history page or contact page. Some web pages have not been updated beyond a few tiny refreshed and new content changes in years.

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